Tempe Campus Events

2018

September

Tue
Sep
25

Meet with a financial consultant on your campus from Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association. Receive free, personalized advice, guidance and support to help you make informed decisions regarding the following: 

  • Adequate investing to retire at the desired age

  • Appropriate investing based on risk tolerance

  • Converting investments into steady income after retirement
  • Meeting financial goals in retirement

 Schedule an appointment today online or call 800-842-2252.

Tue
Sep
25

imPress is juried exhibition featuring printmakers from Diabo Printmakers Guild and students in the renowned printmaking program here at ASU. The exhibit includes a diverse range and exceptional use of printmaking processes, including photopolymer, line etching, aquatint, mezzotint, engraving, photo lithography, plate lithography, linocut, reduction woodcut, monotype, screen print, letterpress, book arts, laser engraving and printed books arts.

Image courtesy of the artist.

Tue
Sep
25

Natives Connecting at ASU is an annual student welcome event organized by ASU American Indian Student Support Services, a unit of University College.

Come learn more about ASU and community resources, services and programs that can support your success. Choose the date or campus location that works best for you:

  • Sept. 13 — Downtown Phoenix campus, Post Office Building, room L1-32, noon to 2 p.m.
  • Sept. 19 — Polytechnic campus, Student Union, Cooley Ballroom, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Sept. 25 — Tempe campus, Discovery Hall, room 312, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Sept. 27 — West campus, Fletcher Library, room 117, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

There will be refreshments and raffle prizes during each event.

Tue
Sep
25

Come speak out on behalf of the books, ideas and works of art that have been banned, censored or challenged throughout human history.

In recognition of Banned Books Week, an annual celebration of books and our right to read them, ASU Library is hosting a "read out," a public reading of books, newspapers, plays and other texts that have been banned, challenged or restricted in some way, or that speak to the issue of freedom of speech. 

The theme for this year’s Banned Books Week, sponsored by the American Library Association, is “Speak Out.” 

Related events will take place at all ASU libraries on all campuses during Banned Books Week from Sept. 23–30.

 

Tue
Sep
25

Anand Gopal will present a paper on governance and conflict in Afghanistan that contributes to the study of civil war, based on several years of fieldwork. While in Afghanistan, Gopal learned Dari and Pashto and gained access to communities where few other Westerners have worked. Gopal is assistant research professor at the Center on the Future of War and the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, a journalist, sociologist and author of "No Good Men Among the Living: America, the Taliban and the War Through Afghan Eyes," which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award. He is currently researching the conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

Co-sponsored with the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict.

 

Tue
Sep
25

In today’s diverse and highly competitive work environment, employers are looking for candidates who have acquired experience and achieved success in the workplace. Learn about how to earn real life experience, develop new skills, and gain a competitive advantage by attending this career exploration series. Refreshments included!

Tue
Sep
25

Arizona State University's Wind Ensemble and Wind Orchestra present an evening of music by Husa, Holst, Wagner and more.

Wed
Sep
26

Meet on your campus with a financial consultant from Nationwide by appointment. Receive free, personalized advice, guidance and support to help make informed decisions regarding the following:

• Adequate investing to retire at desired age
• Appropriate investing based on risk tolerance 
• Converting investments into steady income after retirement
• Meeting financial goals in retirement

Schedule an appointment online.

Wed
Sep
26

From Will Bowen’s book "A Complaint Free World: How to Stop Complaining and Start Enjoying the Life You Always Wanted," learn how to consciously reformat your brain’s hard drive to reduce pain, improve relationships and become happier. It all begins with a purple bracelet.

Wed
Sep
26

Arizona State University Police offers a free active shooter training class for ASU community members to help them develop skills to increase their chances of surviving an active-shooter event.

Attendees watch active shooter video scenarios and may participate in an ASU police officer instructor-led discussion about tactics that reinforce the "run, hide, fight" concept. Participants are encouraged to ask questions. 

If you are unable to attend an Active Shooter class, enroll in the self-paced online training modules.

Wed
Sep
26

Stop by the Arizona State University Class Ring Event where you can try on class rings and speak to a Herff Jones representative to help you choose your class ring, a symbol of Sun Devil spirit and pride.

To start looking for that perfect ring, click here.

Wed
Sep
26

We have an opportunity and a responsibility to make our world more sustainable. "Career Cafe: Sustainability" will be a space where career advisors and industry experts can meet with students and focus on answering professional development questions related to the field of sustainability. Coffee included!

Wed
Sep
26

Ever wonder how ASU’s compensation program works? Join Carol Hurst, director of compensation, for an overview of how the program has evolved and learn best practices to achieve optimal compensation results for your career at ASU.

Wed
Sep
26

The ASU Book Group's September 2018 reading selection is "The Children Under the Ice" by R.A. Douthitt. The book group is open to all in the ASU community and meets monthly from noon to 1 p.m. in the Piper Writers House on ASU's Tempe campus. Authors are always present. A no-host luncheon follows at the University Club. Attendees at each meeting will be entered into a drawing for a $50 gift certificate! Drawing to be held in April.

Synopsis: Twelve-year-old Mikey hates hockey, but loves newspaper reporting, he's quirky that way. One night, Mikey discovers the newspaper story of a lifetime when he falls through the ice of the Sherman Oaks Pond and sees the ghosts of children with a secret. And that's when everything falls apart. No one believes Mikey's story, not even his dad, the town sheriff. Now Mikey has to let go and trust a ghost to help him solve a crime. Can you trust a ghost to solve a crime? Mikey has to solve the crime and convince the town his story is true before the killer strikes again. Will he do it? Or will the killer get to him first?

The book is available from amazon.com.                                 

Douthitt graduated from ASU with a degree in art. This young-adult novel is part of a trilogy, which includes "The Children in the Garden" and "The Children of Manor House."

The remaining ASU Book Group meetings and selections for 2018—19 are:

The ASU Book Group is sponsored as a community outreach initiative by the Department of English and organized in partnership with the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing.

Wed
Sep
26
Enhance your research

The Institute for Humanities Research's new Faculty Development Workshop series provides resources and assistance for faculty members in the humanities at ASU. These workshops focus on enhancing research practices, assisting in writing for publications, applying for external funding and more.

Designing a digital humanities project

Join us on Sept. 26 to learn how you can incorporate the digital humanities into your research. Elizabeth Grumbach, the project manager of the Institute for Humanities Research's Digital Humanities Initiative, will be sharing methodologies and best practices for designing a digital humanities project.

This workshop will offer participants an introduction to digital humanities fundamentals, specifically tools and methodologies. We will explore technologies and platforms that allow scholars of all skills levels to engage with digital humanities methods. Participants will not only be introduced to a variety of tools (including mapping, visualization, data analytics, and multimedia digital publication platforms), but also discuss how and why to choose specific applications, platforms, and tools based on project needs.

Though lunch will be served, keep in mind the Institute for Humanities Research's is a peanut-free space. Please RSVP to attend.

Location and parking

This event will be hosted in Ross-Blakley Hall at ASU's Tempe campus. The closest parking options are the visitor parking in Lot 44 and the Rural Road parking structure.

Wed
Sep
26

Boost your energy in this easy-to-follow, Latin-inspired, calorie-burning dance party. A Sun Devil Fitness Complex instructor will be leading the class. Please bring a towel and water, and come dressed to participate.

Wed
Sep
26

This is a required workshop for all single semester student teachers. Please register in Handshake at: asu.joinHandshake.com by Friday, Sept. 21. Are you ready to apply for your full-time K–12 teaching positions? You will learn how to best market yourself and your education-related experience throughout your application and interview process for teaching positions. Bring a copy of your current resume and cover letter to get the most out of this workshop.

Wed
Sep
26

Join ASU’s participation in Character Day, which is celebrated by organizations around the globe. Discover the science of character strengths and what research tells us about having an adaptable mind with the skills most needed to flourish in the 21st century like curiosity, empathy or multidisciplinary thinking. Receive a free character strengths discussion kit to take back to your team.

Wed
Sep
26

Join us for a book discussion featuring:

Author Claudia Sadowski-Smith, who earned her PhD in English, is a professor of English and American studies in the Department of English at ASU. She specializes in multiethnic U.S. literatures, immigration studies and border studies. Sadowski-Smith’s book, "The New Immigrant Whiteness: Race, Neoliberalism, and Post-Soviet Migration to the United States" (2018), places post-USSR migration in the larger context of the racialization of contemporary U.S. immigrants. 

Discussant Iveta Silova, who earned her PhD in comparative education as well as history and political science, is a professor and the director of the Center for the Advanced Studies in Global Education at the ASU Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. Born and raised in Soviet Latvia, Silova has since lived and worked in various countries of the former Soviet Union, including Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan and Belarus. Her research looks at post-socialist education transformations, including in her most recent book, "Childhood and Schooling in (Post)Socialist Societies: Memories of Everyday Life" (2018), which she edited with Nelli Piattoeva and Zsuzsa Millei.  

Discussant Laurie Manchester, who earned her PhD in history, is an associate professor in the ASU School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies. She is the author of "Holy Fathers, Secular Sons: Clergy, Intelligentsia, and the Modern Self in Revolutionary Russiawhich won the 2009 Vucinich Prize from the organization now known as Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies. Her current book project focuses on Russian, most of whom were from pious, monarchist families who voluntarily repatriated to the Soviet Union between 1935 and 1960.

Discussant Anna Cichopek-Gajraj, who earned her PhD in history, is an associate professor in the ASU School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies. A native of Krakow, Poland, she studies postwar Polish gentile-Jewish relations in 20th century Poland and abroad, antisemitism and ethnic violence, and "rebuilding" of individual and communal lives. Cichopek-Gajraj’s book, "Beyond Violence: Jewish Survivors in Poland and Slovakia in 1944-1948" (2014), was a finalist of the 2016 Jordan Schnitzer Book Award and a recipient of the 2015 Barbara Heldt Prize Honorable Mention. Her current research project incorporates interviews with Polish Jews and Catholics who came to the United States either as children or teenagers in the first 15 years after World War II.

Dessert will be served at the event.

This event is sponsored by the Melikian Center for Russian, Eurasian and East European Studies and the Department of English.

Parking is available in the ASU Fulton Center parking garage , which is located on South College Avenue just north of East University Drive in Tempe. 

Wed
Sep
26

Join the ASU community for a month-long celebration of Argentine art, literature and culture.

The event series is presented, in part, by ASU Library’s Future of Print initiative, highlighting the Argentine literature collection — located in Noble Library and comprised of more than 8,500 volumes — and the surrounding community of students, scholars, artists and writers whose work connects with it.

All events are free and open to the public.

Wednesday, Sept. 26 — "'If I finish my Yerba, I am fried': The Importance of Yerba Mate in Argentina"
Julia Sarreal, associate professor, School of Humanities, Arts and Cultural Studies
3 to 4:30 p.m., Noble Library 252, Tempe campus

Yerba mate is much more than a caffeinated beverage. The commonly consumed drink in South America is a ritual associated with social connection and relationship building. Dr. Sarreal will discuss the history, culture and production of yerba mate and its significance across Argentine class and culture.

Thursday, Oct. 4 — "Affective Erasure: Representation of Indigenous Peoples in Argentine Cinema"
Cynthia Tompkins, professor, School of International Letters and Cultures
3 to 4:30 p.m., Noble Library 252, Tempe campus

A look at the history of Argentine film with a focus on the cinematic representation of different Indigenous cultures. Dr. Tompkins specializes in contemporary Latin American literature and film and has written about Latin American women writers and cultural production.

Wednesday, Oct.10 — "Argentinian Musical Instruments as Material Culture: Reflections on Collecting and Exhibiting Intruments at the Musical Instrument Museum"
Daniel C. Piper, PhD, Musical Instrument Museum
3 to 4:30 p.m., Design Library Reading Room, Tempe campus

A music scholar and a multi-instrumentalist, Dr. Piper spent a month in Argentina last spring conducting extensive field research with folk musicians. He specializes in ethnographic interviewing, videography and photography, and is a lifelong performer. 

Wednesday, Oct.17 — "The Peronista Archive of Photographer Sara Facio"
David William Foster, Regents’ Professor, School of International Letters and Cultures
3 to 4:30 p.m., Noble Library 252, Tempe campus

Argentine urban photography is a focus of Dr. Foster’s research which looks at the cultural production of Latin American cities. A leading scholar of Latin American culture, he is working to build one of the world's largest collections of photography of Buenos Aires.

Thursday, Oct. 18 — "Meteors and Art"
Guillermo Faivovich and Nicolas Goldberg, artists, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Noon to 1 p.m., Design Library Reading Room, Tempe campus

Combining the roles of scientist, historian and anthropologist, artists Faivovich and Goldberg will discuss their work that offers new ways of seeing and experiencing the results of a meteor shower that occurred about 4,000 years ago in northern Argentina.

Wednesday, Oct. 24 — "Tango Night"
ASU Tango Club
4 to 6 p.m., Noble Library patio, Tempe campus

A popular partner dance originating in the late 19th century, the tango consists of a variety of styles that developed over time and in different regions of Argentina. Come learn the iconic dance style characterized by a close embrace and small, syncopated steps.

Wed
Sep
26

Join the ASU Library Map and Geospatial Hub in hosting a workshop providing hands-on training with JMARS.

JMARS (Java Mission-Planning and Analysis for Remote Sensing) is a software suite for viewing and analyzing remote sensing data retrieved from a variety of sources. JMARS was originally developed as a mission planning tool for the THEMIS instrument orbiting Mars on the Odyssey spacecraft. Over the years, functionality has been added to view and study data from other instruments on Mars and other planetary bodies including Earth, the Moon, Mercury, Venus, moons of Jupiter and Saturn, and even asteroids. With functions such as the ability to create shapefiles, draw profile lines, stack data products in layers, import/export data, count craters, and save your work for later, JMARS has become a powerful geographic information system. With a variety of data products available with no user processing necessary, JMARS makes access to scientific data readily available.

Members of the ASU School of Earth and Space Exploration's Mars Space Flight Facility will lead this workshop.

JMARS is a FOSS (free open source software) application, and can be installed on Mac, Windows, Linux, and Solaris. Download installation files.

See the full calendar of Map and Geospatial Hub events.

Wed
Sep
26

Continuing your education through a graduate or specialty program could be an option to consider as you work your way through your current program. It is important to consider the pros and cons of pursuing a graduate education and whether it will help you achieve your future goals. Learn about whether or not graduate school is right for you by attending this career exploration workshop. Refreshments included!

Thu
Sep
27

Food Truck Thursday returns with its first event on Thursday, Sept. 27, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the corner of Sixth Street and College Avenue, near lot 67 and the College Avenue Commons.

Free parking is available nearby in designated lots. View the location

Thu
Sep
27
"From Targets to Translation: Deconvoluting Tumor Vulnerabilities in Drug Development in Hepatobiliary Cancers"

This Center for Evolution and Medicine Seminar features Mitesh J. Borad, M.D., an assistant professor of medicine and director of Phase I Drug Development at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. He obtained his internal medical training at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and completed his medical oncology fellowship at Tulane University School of Medicine. Prior to joining Mayo Clinic, he spent three years at the Translational Genomics Research Institute as a Genomics Medicine Scholar. He has been serving on the NCI Hepatobiliary Task Force since 2011.

His research and clinical interests are in development of novel treatments for patients with biliary and liver cancers. His team has been engaged in whole genome analysis efforts in cholangiocarcinoma with focus on discovery of novel drug targets and their subsequent implementation in the clinic with the long range goal of providing precision medicine to patients with cholangiocarcinoma.

Thu
Sep
27

Unfortunately, many of our favorite recipes are delicious but not very healthy. ASU Nnutrition graduate students will teach techniques to modify your family’s favorite dishes. Learn recipe makeovers to create more healthful versions without sacrificing flavor

This class is taught by graduate students in the ASU nutrition program who are training to become registered dietitian nutritionists.

Thu
Sep
27
For more information, please visit https://pac-12.com/womens-soccer/event/2018/09/27/colorado-arizona-state

Broadcast network: ASU Live Stream