A Crisis in American Christianity? How Scholar-Practitioners Can Engage the Current Moment

The 2019 Maxine and Jonathan Marshall Speaker on Religion and Conflict with David Gushee

There are historical moments in many countries when social and political developments become so toxic that religious and scholarly leaders, and the communities they serve, conclude that neutrality and/or disengagement is immoral. Examples include early Nazi Germany, the civil rights movement in America, apartheid South Africa, and others. In Germany, beginning after Hitler took power in 1933, the Confessing Church arose to stand in protest, mainly against Nazi interventions in the life and doctrine of the German Evangelical Church, though some went beyond that. This talk will explore the story of the Confessing Church in Germany, as well as the current moment in America, to ask about the role of Christianity, and scholars of religion and other engaged citizens, in such a time as this.

The event will be live-streamed at: https://asunow.asu.edu/asulive

Rev. David P. Gushee (PhD, Union Theological Seminary, New York) is Distinguished University Professor of Christian Ethics and Director of the Center for Theology and Public Life at Mercer University in Georgia. One of the premier Christian ethicists in the world, he is the author or editor of twenty-four books, including "Righteous Gentiles of the Holocaust," "Changing Our Mind," "Still Christian" and his latest, "Moral Leadership for a Divided Age: Fourteen People Who Dared to Change Our World." Gushee has served as the President of the American Academy of Religion, and as the President of the Society of Christian Ethics.

The Maxine and Jonathan Marshall Speaker Series on Religion and Conflict is an endowed lecture series that honors the life-long commitment of Maxine Besser Marshall ('76) and Jonathan Marshall to the arts, education, civil liberties, and world peace.

Date: 
Thursday, September 19, 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Price: 
Free
Campus: 
Tempe campus
Location: 
West Hall, Room 135